5 Tips for Hiring Nannies in Bangkok

20 July 2015, BKK Kids

Looking to hire a nanny? Here are 5 helpful tips.

1. Decide what kind of help you need. In addition to childcare, do you require a nanny to take care of light housework, laundry, meals, grocery shopping, school runs, pet care, and/or gardening? Make a list of your needs. Some nannies can do everything, while others can only do (or are willing to do) so much beyond caring for children. Make your expectations clear from the start to avoid problems, including issues with your other helpers, such as maids (if any).

2. Determine the living situation – do you require a live-in or live-out nanny? You would typically be responsible for a live-in nanny’s room and board, providing a room, and three meals a day or a daily food stipend (usually around 100 to 200 baht).

3. Know the regulations covering domestic help. Aside from the visa and work permit issues (if you have non-Thai help), there are some rules governing benefits for domestic workers, including:

– One day off per week

– At least 13 traditional Thai holidays, including Labour Day (if the holiday falls on the nanny’s day off, she is entitled to take another day off later)

– Sick leave, as needed (you can ask to see a medical doctor’s note if she is out for multiple days at a time), as well as up to 30 days paid sick days

– Six days of leave a year (for those employed for at least one year)

– Payment for work on days off or holidays, at the overtime rate (usually 1.5 times the regular rate)

– Minimum wage in Thailand is currently 300 baht per day or 9,000 baht a month; however, the monthly salary range for full-time nannies in Bangkok is likely 13,000 to 20,000 baht.

– While not required, many families pay one month’s salary as a bonus around New Year or Songkran.

4. Interview the nanny personally. Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions to gauge capacity and personality – after all, this person is going to spend most of their working hours in your home and/or with your kids. In addition, lay out the basic rules, such as mobile phone usage when on duty, screen time limits for the kids, working hours, weekend hours, etc.

5. Ask for references from past employers. If a nanny has previously worked for an expat family, she may have some references. Also, it’s good to ask if she has had a health check-up in the past year and request the results. If not, you can pay to get her one at a local hospital; some hospitals offer health check-up packages for domestic workers.

Editor’s note/disclaimer:  This article provides information, not legal advice, about hiring domestic help in Bangkok.

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